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Ursa Astronomical Association

Aurora rays - 27.9.2019 at 22.25 - 27.9.2019 at 23.15 Parainen Observation number 85867

Visibility II / V


STEVE arc. Watching the calm arc of northern lights in the northern sky, I noticed that the pale "clouds" were drifting at a brisk pace in the sky at an angle of about 30 to 40 degrees, probably 10 min. they went there until I woke up to how bright those "clouds" were, as the Northern Lights did. That's right, but I think they packed in the same tight pile so the brightness increased. (this is how it looked from my point of view)

One image shows how the vertical rays differ from each other (exposure 1s.) Propagates from right to left, in another image a bright pillar is formed until finally the formation begins to disintegrate very slowly. The time interval of the images is about 1/2 h, but the total observation time is closer to an hour.



More similar observations
Additional information
  • Aurora brightness
    • Bright auroras
  • Observed aurora forms
    • STEVE-arc info

      STEVE (Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement), Pink, radial aurora-like arc  . The STEVE arc is seen clearly separated from the main aurora arc of the northern sky. It forms a long and narrow west-east aligned, usually dim form. It does not belong to traditional auroras as a phenomenon, but may appear same time with them. Occasionally there may also be a green, "toothed" band called ”picket fence” at the bottom of Steve.  

      Riku Talvio, STEVE
      Photo by: Riku Talvio

    • Veil info

      Veil
      Veil is the most bland and very common form of aurora. It usually covers its homogeneous dim glow over a wide area of the sky at once. Most often, the veil is seen in the calmer and quiet phase of the night after the aurora maximum as a background for other forms. The veil can also occur alone and in that case it will be quite difficult to reliably identify as an aurora, especially at a observation site which has a lot of light pollution.

      A similar glow of light can also be caused by airborne moisture, smoke, or a very thin layer of clouds that reflects the light that hits them. However, clouds can also be used to identify veil, especially if the middle or upper cloud appears dark against a lighter background, then it is very likely to be aurora veil if the brightness of the background sky is not due to the rising or falling Moon or Sun. When photographing, very long exposure times usually reveal the green colour of the veil auroras.

      Veil and rays. Photo by Esa Palmi.
       

      Red aurora veil. Photo by Marko Mikkilä.

       

      Veil. Photo by Milla Myllymaa.

       

      Aurora veil that changes color from green at the lower edge through purple to blue at the top. Photo by Jaakko Hatanpää.

       

      Dim green veil. Photo by Jarmo Leskinen.

       

      Radial aurora band surrounded by veil. Photo by Jussi Alanenpää.

    • Band info

      Bands are usually narrower, more twisty at the bottom, brighter, and more active than arches. Bands usually develop from arches.

      Bands can form J and U shapes, sometimes even full spirals. The corona can also arise from bands. Bands are a fairly common form of aurora.

      Aurora band. Photo by Merja Ruotsalainen.

      Aurora band. Photo by Matias Takala.

      Aurora band. Photo by Lea Rahtu-Korpela.

      Aurora bands. Photo by Lauri Koivuluoma.

      Aurora band. Photo by Matias Takala.

    • Arc info

      ARC The arcs are wider than the bands and do not fold as strongly. The arcs are normally neither very bright nor active.

      The arc is probably the most common form of aurora. When aurora show is a calm arc in the low northern sky it often doesn’t evolve to anything more during night. In more active shows the arc is often the first form to appear and the last to disappear.

      The lower edge of the arc is usually sharp but the upper edge can gradually blend into the background sky. As activity increases rays and folds normally develop, and the arcs turn gradually into bands.

      An aurora arc runs across the picture. Vertical shapes are rays. Photo by Atacan Ergin.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Mauri Korpi.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Anna-Liisa Sarajärvi.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Matti Asumalahti.

Comments: 1 pcs
Timo Alanko - 3.10.2019 at 20.13 Report this

Upea dokumentointi! 

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