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Skywarden,
Ursa Astronomical Association
Kopernikuksentie 1
00130 Helsinki
taivaanvahti(at)ursa.fi

Ursa Astronomical Association

Active aurora band - 7.10.2018 at 20.54 - 7.10.2018 at 23.11 Inkoo Observation number 78318

Visibility III / V

Matias Takala, Kuopion Saturnus

I went to Kopparnäs to photograph the Milky Way, although I was aware of the possibility of northern lights. When I got there, the sky was partly cloudy. The arc of northern lights passing through the zenith stood out. The couple of Lords were just about to leave, had also come for the same things but left because of the clouds. I took a few shots of the northern lights quickly and also tried the Milky Way but there were clouds in front of it. I thought to wait if the weather would clear up, but then roughly the only deaf rain in all of Southern Finland struck and had to flee the place. I set off to drive home but noticed a bright star in the shallow north. I stopped the car and glanced at the weather, it was pretty clear. Then nothing more than back the same route.

The northern lights were no longer an arc in the low north but I raped to go the Milky Way. Panu Lahtinen had put a potential SAR arc in the WA group and checked from Ursa Artjärvi's camera that it also passes through the summer triangle. Yes, despite all the cloud adventures, it seems to get stuck, even though at that point it was already clearly dimmed in the Star Rock picture.

Others came to the same things and once the Milky Way businesses had been taken care of, a new storm was expected when the 1h forecast looked promising. As he looked east, he noticed that now those rays were moving fast. Now the cannon didn't rise very high but it was pretty. It was damn damp and the front element of the glass started to mist up, which can be seen in the pictures. Fixing it seemed too hard so I let it be, it got the effect on top of the deal.

The return trip was pretty foggy, I wondered when the windshield wouldn’t clear at all. It didn't occur to me then that it could be easier if you adjusted the windshield ... Fortunately, however, it became clear on the way that you didn't have to guess where you were going. #sarg



More similar observations
Additional information
  • Aurora brightness
    • Bright auroras
  • Observed aurora forms
    • Arc info

      ARC The arcs are wider than the bands and do not fold as strongly. The arcs are normally neither very bright nor active.

      The arc is probably the most common form of aurora. When aurora show is a calm arc in the low northern sky it often doesn’t evolve to anything more during night. In more active shows the arc is often the first form to appear and the last to disappear.

      The lower edge of the arc is usually sharp but the upper edge can gradually blend into the background sky. As activity increases rays and folds normally develop, and the arcs turn gradually into bands.

      An aurora arc runs across the picture. Vertical shapes are rays. Photo by Atacan Ergin.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Mauri Korpi.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Anna-Liisa Sarajärvi.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Matti Asumalahti.

    • Band info

      Bands are usually narrower, more twisty at the bottom, brighter, and more active than arches. Bands usually develop from arches.

      Bands can form J and U shapes, sometimes even full spirals. The corona can also arise from bands. Bands are a fairly common form of aurora.

      Aurora band. Photo by Merja Ruotsalainen.

      Aurora band. Photo by Matias Takala.

      Aurora band. Photo by Lea Rahtu-Korpela.

      Aurora bands. Photo by Lauri Koivuluoma.

      Aurora band. Photo by Matias Takala.

    • Rays info

      The raysare parallel to the lines of force of the magnetic field, i.e. quite vertical, usually less than one degree thick light streaks. The rays can occur alone or in connection with other shapes, mainly with arcs and bands. Short rays are usually brightest at the bottom but dim quickly. The longest rays, even extending almost from the horizon to the zenith, are usually uniformly bright and quite calm, and unlike the shorter rays, most often occur in groups of a few rays or alone. Rays, like bands, are a very typical form of aurora.

      Artificial light pillars, which are a halo phenomenon visible in ice mist, can sometimes be very similar to the rays of aurora. Confusion is possible especially when the lamps that cause the artificial light pillars are far away and not visible behind buildings or the forest. The nature of the phenomenon is clear at least from the photographs.

      Rays. Picture of Tom Eklund.

      Rays. Photo by Mika Puurula.

      Two beams rise from the aurora veil. Photo by Anssi Mäntylä.

      Two radial bands. Show Jani Lauanne.

      Radial band and veil. Photo by Jussi Alanenpää.

      Two rays. Photo by Aki Taavitsainen.

      It may be possible to confuse such rays with artificial light columns. Compare the image below. Picture of Tom Eklund.

      There is no aurora in this image, but all the light poles - including the wide and diffuse bar seen at the top left - are artificial light pillars born of ice mist. Photo by Sami Jumppanen.

      Aurora and artificial light pillars. All the radial shapes in the picture above are probably artificial light pillars that coincide appropriately with the aurora band. In the image below, the aurora band has shifted and does not overlap with the pillars produced by the orange bulbs. There is no orange in auroras. Photo by Katariina Roiha

    • Veil info

      Veil
      Veil is the most bland and very common form of aurora. It usually covers its homogeneous dim glow over a wide area of the sky at once. Most often, the veil is seen in the calmer and quiet phase of the night after the aurora maximum as a background for other forms. The veil can also occur alone and in that case it will be quite difficult to reliably identify as an aurora, especially at a observation site which has a lot of light pollution.

      A similar glow of light can also be caused by airborne moisture, smoke, or a very thin layer of clouds that reflects the light that hits them. However, clouds can also be used to identify veil, especially if the middle or upper cloud appears dark against a lighter background, then it is very likely to be aurora veil if the brightness of the background sky is not due to the rising or falling Moon or Sun. When photographing, very long exposure times usually reveal the green colour of the veil auroras.

      Veil and rays. Photo by Esa Palmi.
       

      Red aurora veil. Photo by Marko Mikkilä.

       

      Veil. Photo by Milla Myllymaa.

       

      Aurora veil that changes color from green at the lower edge through purple to blue at the top. Photo by Jaakko Hatanpää.

       

      Dim green veil. Photo by Jarmo Leskinen.

       

      Radial aurora band surrounded by veil. Photo by Jussi Alanenpää.

    • Dunes info

      Dunes

      The dunes are a dim and very rare shape that has so far been associated with the aurora visible in early evening.

      Aurora dunes can be most easily confused to ribbons on lower clouds. In order to fill in the description of the phenomenon, a striped pattern formed by parallel lines must also appear in the aurora. The stripes are most easily recognizable right at the front edge of the aurora but they may also occur among the rest of the aurora.

      The dune auroras are visible as a parallel striped float. Photo by Tapio Terenius

      Raidallisen dyynilautan reunassa voi toisinaan olla voimakastakin aaltoilua.

      There can sometimes be strong ripples at the edge of a striped dune float. The rippling of the edge of the dune float can vary from minor to large (pictured). Photo by Pirjo Koski

    • Red Arc with Green Diffuse Aurora (RAGDA) info

      Red Arc with Green Diffuse Aurora (RAGDA), is a two-component form of northern lights that occurs south of the oval.

      Both parts of the aurora are formed when positive particles from the magnetosphere hit the Earth's upper atmosphere. The phenomenon occurs before magnetic midnight during large aurora substorms and is best distinguished when it deteches southward from the bright rays of the substorm aurora.

      The phenomenon consists of a faint red arc, which looks a lot like a Stable Auroral Red (SAR)-arc. The common factor for these two red arcs is the reaction of the ring current with the substorm.

      Antero Ohranen, RAGDA
      A Red Arc with Green Diffuse Aurora
      Photo: Antero Ohranen

       

      Below the red arc are green diffuse patches or sausage-like shapes. RAGDA's green aurora is essentially featureless and without any rays. It may appear slightly more bluish in camera images compared to the green aurora of the oval.

      Lasse Nurminen, RAGDA
      RAGDA's green has slightly more bluish shade than the rest of the oval.
      Photo: Lasse Nurminen

       

      Sometimes the red arc and the green patches are clearly separated from the aurora oval and sometimes almost in contact with the southward edge of the oval.

      During an active substorm, the green northern lights can sometimes be seen with red tops. These usually have rays that RAGDA's green aurora lacks.

      An emissionless gap without any aurora light can be observed between the red arc and green diffuse aurora. The two features don't seem to be connected. Of the two aligned structures, the red one is located ~ 100 kilometers higher than the green aurora.

      Markku Ruonala, RAGDA
      There seems to be an empty area without any aurora light between the red and green aurora.
      Photo: Markku Ruonala

       

      The event is dynamic. It sometimes starts with green blobs, then a red arc appears. These two can also appear in the sky at the same time. The shapes move often from east to west. Then the Red Arc with Green Diffuse Aurora fades away and only the red arc remains visible in the sky. The red arc is recognized as the SAR arc.

      Observing this phenomenon is easier when the night sky is clear and dark before magnetic midnight. When looking for the red arc with green diffuse aurora, the best results can be achieved by pointing the camera towards south or southwest of the brightest part of the oval.

      A wide-angle lens is recommended for photographing the shape of the red arc going over the sky, but a regular lens can also be used. The red arc is quite dim, so the exposure times needed are typically longer than the ones for northern lights.

      Pirjo Koski, RAGDA
      Two RAGDA-arcs
      Photo: Pirjo Koski

       

      If the red arc cannot be distinguished in the images, the phenomenon identification 'Diffuse green auroras' should be used for isolated hazy green blobs/arc.

      Matias Takala, RAGDA
      Dunes in RAGDA's green aurora
      Photo: Matias Takala

       

  • Colors with unaided eye and other features
    • Green auroras info

      Green, seen with the naked eye, is one the most common colors of the aurora. The green color is derived from atomic oxygen.

      Green auroras. Lea Rahtu-Korpela.

      Green auroras. Photo by Juha Ojanperä.

    • Red coloration of the shapes lower edge info

      Red lower edge visible with the naked eye. The bands which are starting to level up their activity and are green colored have quite often a narrow red lower edge. This is the most common form of red color which is derived from molecular nitrogen.

      Aurora band with purple lower edge. Photo by Ilmo Kemppainen.

      The low hanging brightest aurora band is colored red at the lower edge. Photo by Tero Ohranen.

      Narrow purple reddish tones at the lower part of this aurora band. Photo by Merja Ruotsalainen.

      Purple band at the bottom. Photo by Panu Lahtinen.

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